$7,035.57 = How much it costs to travel around the world through nine countries over five and a half months

 

Since I get a lot of questions about how much it actually costs to travel, I thought I might go through what my trip around the world (across Asia to Europe and back to the US, click here for the rough map) cost according to my bank statements.

Cost is obviously one of the most important factors in deciding where and when to travel. Before beginning, I should say that a lot of my trip was in the low season for many places (that is, not summer), and I would almost always travel in the cheapest class of transportation Read More ...

Revisited: How to pack for an independent traveler with no set return date

 

As I am starting a trip that will take me from China to (hopefully) Eastern Europe over the next several months, I thought I might go through what I am packing for this trip. There have been a few changes since my last trip's packing list (link for original packing post), mostly in terms of electronics, but for the most part it is very similar. Overall, my goal is maximum mobility and minimum weight, but not bare-bones, super lightweight (for that, see No-baggage challenge). My backpack is right around 25-28 pounds (11-13 kg), so it's light Read More ...

A glimpse in the thoughts of Bolod Namkhai Mukhadi

 

Click here for an explanation of "A glimpse in the thoughts of..."

Bolod was the owner of the guesthouse that I stayed at in Ulaanbataar, and, due to it being the low tourist season, also my source of transport/translation when I headed out to the Mongolian countryside. His main guesthouse was actually closed, but I stayed in his "suburban guesthouse", which was just a room in his house with his wife and kids.

He grew up in a small village in Eastern Mongolia and came to the capital when he was young for school. Coming of age when Read More ...

How to get Chinese and Russian visas as a United States citizen: My experience

 

Preparing for my trip to Asia, I had to obtain visas before arrival to China and Russia. Since I am just finishing up this process, I wanted to describe the steps that I went through in case anyone might be doing the same thing and wants to save some time on research. This is geared for the independent traveler without set itinerary.

I want to emphasize that it may be different depending on where you are from in the United States (and obviously different if you are from a different country, check here for the Russian consulate and Read More ...

Marathon hitchhiking: Southern Mexico to Michigan in 7 days over 3,400 mi

 

Day 1

5:30 am. I'm leaving my hostel in San Cristobal as the sun breaks, already reminiscing about the cool weather, good people, and nice local markets stocked with fresh produce every day for pennies. I have left myself two weeks to hitchhike back to Michigan (click here to see the route). After talking with a few of the dread-locked, unicycle-riding sort on the street last night about hitchhiking, I decide to take colectivos up to Villahermosa since hitching in Chiapas is supposedly fraught with long waits and suspicious people. Another big plus is that the main highway to Read More ...

Mango Surprise: Being the victim of a random, delicious act of kindness

 

This story is the other side of the news reports, the non-profitable story, the anti-State Department website of the capital of Guatemala, Guatemala City. Instead of pointless violence, I am writing about pointless kindness.

After being abroad for a long period of time in non-traditional tourist spots, a certain persistent question always and unavoidably comes up: “But, isn’t it dangerous in [insert city]?” Even between long-term travelers who should know better the question is frequently asked, with swapping stories of tourist crime (usually second or third hand and undoubtedly exaggerated for narrative effect) being an entertaining way to pass the time Read More ...

How to wash your clothes by hand while traveling quickly and effectively

You have set out to travel to extract yourself from the daily routine, but there is one chore that will never go away: dirty clothes (nudist colonies an exception). And if you´re trying to save money on the road, or just don´t trust that random lady on the corner lavanderia, washing your clothes by hand is the only option that´s left. The good news is that it´s easier than you think, and with practice becomes no chore at all and you can tailor it to your situation. Here´s a quick run down on how to get it done.

Read More ...

How to get the local price for anything while abroad

With the cash economy spread to every corner of the globe, it´s no hidden fact that travelers abroad are many times looked at more as breathing cash machines and less as curiosities from foreign lands. It´s not that people are necessarily looking to grab money from tourists, but rather that poverty incentivizes creative pricing where price tags are lacking. Those of us traveling on a budget for extended periods need to economize since we´re already putting a hefty bit of cash into the local economies of the places we visit, so let opportunists prey on the less saavy traveler. There Read More ...

Who's site is this, anyways?

 

Why do I have a site about traveling? Well, I wanted to share useful tips and knowledge that I have gathered while traveling as well as my experiences. Why do I like traveling? I think Pico Iyer says it best:

 

The person susceptible to 'wanderlust' is not so much addicted to movement as committed to transformation.

 

After finishing undergrad at the University of Michigan, I hit the road for a long term trip on my own terms. Although I'd dipped my feet in independent travel, that months-long trip without set obligations had evaded me.

Share
 

A quick peek at the Zona Cafetera/Coffee-producing Zone

IMG_1106Ironically I didn´t see any coffee production while there, but it was quite nice nonetheless. There are a cluster of small, beautiful villages throughout the region around the larger cities, and I settled on seeing Salento since there was supposedly a nice valley nearby (Valle de Cocorá). Salento was a little town squeezed between the mountains, and I found a quaint little hostel to camp at owned by a rolo (someone from Bogotá) for my stay. I spent a day lounging around after the overnight bus and a day to walk through the Valley of Cocorá known for its freakishly tall wax palm trees. I wasn´t too keen to see the coffee farms since I had already seen coffee production in the south on my last visit to Colombia, so I took a pass on that.

Share
 

Recent Photos

Camping in Puerto Olbaldia along the Atlantic.JPG
Leaf cutter ants in the Darien.JPG
The crystal clear waters of Porvenir.JPG
The jungle of the Darien.JPG
The ornate mola of the Kuna Yala people.JPG
Wax plams in Salento.JPG
a central plaza in tikal.JPG
a compass while hitching back to the US from mexico.JPG
a fire juggler near lago atitlan.JPG
a semuc champey in guatemala.JPG
a the market in san cristobal.JPG
a zapatista graffiti while in san cristobal.JPG
Copyright © 2009-2017 Experiments In Wandering | Tyler S. Cole